Skip to content
  • Culture
  • Learning

Code Mentoring at Kolibri Games

May 31, 2019 | 2 minute read

blog-header-code-mentoring

Kolibri Games is home to many talented people who are all extremely good at many different things (after all, making games requires a diverse set of skills). Because for us learning never stops, we learn from each other in many different ways, be it at work or in our free time, professionally or privately.
One of these learning elements that has been around for quite a while are our code mentoring groups. Here, one of our code wizards introduces a group of a maximum of two students to the art of coding. Be it the very basics of C#, how to start using Unity, making small games or advanced stuff, like improving code architecture or writing sophisticated scripts. Over the course of their existence, our code mentoring groups have created some amazing projects and have established friendships across teams — some of the earlier students have learned so much that they are now mentors with their own groups.
So in this edition, have a look over the shoulders of three of our code groups and find out what they are working on:

Group 4 — Le Coding Club

 

In Group 4, Idle Miner Tycoon Dev Greg is teaching Jonas and Kristin (both in QA) how to build games in Unity. Kristin is making her own version of Flappy Bird and Jonas is creating a clicker game. The group is one of our oldest ones and celebrated its one year anniversary not too long ago.

Group 13 — The Python Party

In Group 13, Nikolai, DevOps Engineer, and our Accountant Christophe are working on a project that directly improves their work. The two are writing a script that helps Christophe process and clean up raw financial data that he gets from different sources and allows him to format the data for internal controlling.

Group 20 — Masters of the Basics

In Group 20, Idle Factory Tycoon Dev Steven is Teaching Management Assistant Clara about the deep basics of coding, such as code architecture and syntax, before they move on to bigger projects, like building games.

Written by Tom Weber

Scroll To Top